Useful Information

 

 

New On-line Dispute Resolution (ODR) platform launched

New consumer protection laws have come into force aimed at making it easier for shoppers to resolve disputes with on-line retailers.

As from Monday, February 15, 2016 on-line retailers must direct dissatisfied consumers towards an online dispute resolution (ODR) service.

The measures bring online retailers in line with the high street, which has been offering alternative dispute resolution (ADR) since last October.

Traders are not mandated to use either ODR or ADR but it is believed that the potential benefits of good customer relations will encourage them to do so.

Since ADR regulations came into force, 30 per cent of traders said they were willing to use it and 70 per cent of EU consumers were satisfied with how their complaint was handled by an ADR.

The new ODR platform was set up by the European Commission and is available here: http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/odr/. However, consumers can also initially contact Citizens Advice Consumer Service (frontline telephone consumer advice service) on 03454 04 05 06 or visit or write to:  The Highland Council Trading Standards Service, 38 Harbour Road, Inverness IV1 1UF about any consumer dispute they may have.

For further information about your consumer rights when buying goods and services or information on how to resolve consumer disputes go to Highland Council Trading Standards Newspage at:

http://www.highland.gov.uk/tradingstandardsnews

or follow Highland Council Trading Standards on Facebook at:

https://www.facebook.com/HCTradingStandards

Mrs Glenys Brown

Trading Standards Officer, Highland Council

38 Harbour Road, Inverness. IV1 1UF

Tel: 01463 228 717

E-mail: glenys.brown@highland.gov.uk

www.highland.gov.uk/tradingstandards


 

New Consumer Rights when buying digital gadgets and gizmos for Christmas (10/12/2015)

Highland Council Trading Standards want to remind consumers that they have a clear right to a repair or replacement if faulty digital content is found.

The law defines ‘digital content’ as data which is produced and supplied in digital form. It is not dealt with in the same way as other goods and services.

Examples of digital content include:

  • Computer software
  • Apps (short for ‘applications’ and usually linked with software that allows you to access activities on your smart phone or tablet, such as news, weather, social media)
  • Games
  • Ringtones
  • E-books
  • Television
  • Music
  • Video

Digital content can be supplied in physical form, such as on a DVD, and in an intangible form (something you cannot physically touch), such as when you download or stream it and when you access it via the internet.

The Consumer Rights Act 2015 applies to:

  • digital content that you have paid for, and
  • digital content supplied free of charge with goods, services or other digital content that you have paid for and which is not generally available without buying such goods, services or other digital content.

The new remedy of a free repair or replacement applies if the digital content is found to be:

  • not of satisfactory quality (e.g. faulty)
  • not as described or
  • not fit for the particular purpose for which it was bought.

Unlike faulty goods, there is no direct right to a refund and this type of product is also exempt from the short term right to reject (30 days) which is applicable to other consumer contracts for goods and services.

However, where faulty digital content cannot be repaired or replaced without significant inconvenience to the consumer, then the consumer may have a final right to reject this product and request compensation, which could result in a full refund of the purchase price paid.

Also where the faulty digital content purchased has damaged a consumers device, (such as software downloaded with a virus which has perhaps deleted music or photo computer files on your system), the a consumer can ask for the files to be reinstated free of charge or compensation.

As more and more shoppers are purchasing digital content products for Christmas stockings and gifts, Highland Council Trading Standards urge all consumer to know their rights and act quickly if things go wrong.

For more information about these new shopping rights, consumers can speak to an advisor from the Citizens Advice Consumer Service (frontline telephone consumer advice service) on 03454 04 05 06. Consumers can also write or visit Highland Council Trading Standards Service, 38 Harbour Road, Inverness IV1 1UF.

For further information about consumer rights when buying goods and digital content products and information on how to resolve consumer disputes go to Highland Council Trading Standards newspage at:

www.highland.gov.uk/tradingstandardsnews

or on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/HCTradingStandards